Healthy Eating in Schools

News Release Date: 
01.18.13


Tracy Tylka, Assistant Professor of Psychology
The Ohio State University at Marion

In light of the prevalence of media attention and school concern over both childhood obesity and eating disorders, Ohio State Marion associate professor Dr. Tracy Tylka recently co-authored a book on the subject entitled, Healthy Eating in Schools: Evidence-Based Interventions to Help Kids Thrive.

A noted researcher and international expert on body image and eating behavior, Tylka co-authored Healthy Eating in Schools with Catherine P. Cook-Cottone, PhD and Evelyn Tribole, MS, RD. The book calls upon the expertise of the three authors and looks at an empirically-based "conceptual model" for understanding child eating problems. This model serves as a guide to implement more effective programs in schools that foster physical and psychological health via "body acceptance and intuitive eating — a flexible, healthy eating behavior involving awareness of the body's hunger and satiety cues."

The book is scheduled to be released April 15, 2013 and is being published by the American Psychological Association.


Book Overview from APA
Concern over increased childhood obesity has spurred various school-based interventions. However, these interventions often have little positive effect and may inadvertently contribute to unhealthy behaviors during weight loss attempts. Indeed, a general emphasis on appearance and weight (rather than health) can promote eating disordered behaviors.

This book provides a conceptual model for understanding both obesity and eating disordered behaviors. Specifically, it advocates for body acceptance and intuitive eating — a flexible, healthy eating behavior involving awareness of the body's hunger and satiety cues.

Within this context, the chapters review evidence-based school interventions in nutrition, self-regulation, exercise, body acceptance, media literacy, and mindfulness. Guidance is also provided for identifying, referring, and supporting students with emerging eating disorders.

Without empirically supported guidance, schools run the risk of implementing ineffective or harmful programming in an effort to do good. Thus, this book is a much needed resource for teachers, administrators, counselors, nurses, and other school personnel.

To learn more or order a copy of this book visit the American Psychology Association website:
http://www.apa.org/pubs/books/4317303.aspx